stress

Why guess about your eye pressure when you can know?

Submitted by belann on Fri, 08/13/2010 - 3:05pm

I have had my tonometer for almost 6 months.  It has answered a multitude of questions about how my daily routine affects my health.  I didn't know, for example, that just taking a walk outside for a half hour or so would reduce my eye pressure, sometimes by as much as 50%.  I also didn't know that I wasn't one of the people whose pressures are higher at night--in fact my lowest pressures are at night.  (That was good news.  I was tired of sleeping with my head elevated).  

I have found no supplements that had any effect on lowering my IOP, but I have found that some supplements will raise my IOP quite significantly.  I know that out of control thoughts and periods of stress significantly raise my IOP in spite of the two drops I am using or any other healthy lifestyle choices I am making. 

Read more...

 

The cost of losing one's vision is far greater than the cost of buying a tonometer or of learning a proven meditation technique

Submitted by dave on Wed, 09/28/2016 - 1:16am

Most FitEyes discussion happens on our very active mailing list. If you want the latest news, subscribe to our mailing list.

I took part in a mailing list discussion today. A number of people asked me to post the following message on my blog for easy reference. For context I will include the comments I was responding to first, followed by my response. (I'm editing parts of this for privacy and clarity.)

FitEyes Podcasts

 

Stress and Eye Pressure

Does psychological stress and mental states affect eye pressures or contribute to the risk of glaucoma? Read here to find out.

The effect of measurement order between right and left eyes

Submitted by Bailey on Sun, 04/03/2011 - 7:14am

Effect of Measurement Order Between Right and Left Eyes on Intraocular Pressure Measurement

http://archopht.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/short/129/3/276

Melike Pekmezci, MD; Sidney T. Chang, MD; Bradley S. Wilson, MA; Mae O. Gordon, PhD; Anjali M. Bhorade, MD, MSCI

Arch Ophthalmol. 2011;129(3):276-281. doi:10.1001/archophthalmol.2011.33

I am trying to take life easy but I note that my high eye pressures does not come down

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on Fri, 06/11/2010 - 10:54am

The following is part of a conversation between Dave and a new member of the FitEyes self-tonometry research community.

I am trying to take life easy but I note that the high pressures do not come down.

List of all the things that affect eye pressure

Submitted by dave on Fri, 04/23/2010 - 12:30am

I'd like to ask everyone with a tonometer and good eye pressure data to contribute comments to this post. What factors have we identified that affect eye pressure? I'm going to start the list informally with things that come off the top of my head. I'll revise and refine this list based on feedback from people with tonometers and good data. Thank you!

Reduces Eye Pressure

Doing things slowly in a fast world

Submitted by dave on Thu, 04/22/2010 - 7:30pm

The entire following blog post was intially written as a private email to a friend of mine. I decided to share it here.

I grew up doing fast things in a fast way. I raced motorcycles -- and I have always loved anything fast. But I also tried to accomplish the maximum possible number of things each day and I always pushed myself to do things quicker or more efficiently. Then I developed glaucoma.

As I have gotten to know myself more intimately (thanks in part to self-tonometry) I have realized that I actually like to take my time. I enjoy doing things in a non-rushed manner. You could even say that I enjoy being slow! (Something I never would have admitted to myself in my days of racing, even in my most private thoughts.) Even today, I still have a great admiration for people who do things quickly, as if this is an inherently superior way of being.

But I now know that I like to take my time doigo slow to reduce eye pressureng things. I still enjoy efficiency. But sometimes it is more efficient to delay the next project's start and finish what was started rather than have to terminate it due to an artificial deadline and then pick it up again at a later time. I like going deep into things (whether discussions, research or building software) and having the time to do it well. And I have found that sometimes I even enjoy doing something in a completely inefficient manner (saying that still sounds sacrilegious). Sometimes I enjoy just plain being slow! (What have I just said! My gosh!)

I suspected stress was related to glaucoma

Submitted by muse on Sat, 03/13/2010 - 5:34pm

When I went to get my eyes examined for a new prescription, the Dr. told me I had glaucoma. I couldn't believe it. I had so many health problems already due to stress, that I cried and cried. He said my eyes were dry and right away I figured it was from the adrenal exhaustion I suffered a couple years back, which I am on the mend from... but it is taking time. My nails, skin, hair, mouth and now eyes were dry. It is a good thing I know I am not a body. ~g~ I am a huge fan of Byron Katie and Gary Renard's contributions to the world.

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