glaucoma

A Comprehensive Program of Glaucoma Dietary Supplements

What follows is my personal approach to glaucoma supplementation. I have arrived at this approach after decades of intense personal study (on top of my education in biochemistry).

Leading Medical Specialists From Around the World Coalesce Around Home Monitoring For Glaucoma Patients

Submitted by dave on Fri, 07/11/2014 - 9:32pm

Leading Medical Specialists Support Self-Monitoring of Eye Pressure by Glaucoma Patients;

Home Monitoring has Potential to Transform Glaucoma Treatment, Says Co-Author of Recent Journal Article

self-tonometry eye pressure monitoringGrowing recognition among leading ophthalmologists and glaucoma specialists of an alternative option for measuring pressure in the eye may offer new hope for four million Americans – and millions more people worldwide – who risk permanent blindness, says a co-author of a recent article in the Survey of Ophthalmology.

Are we stuck where we were ten years ago, or is a revolution under way?

Submitted by dave on Tue, 05/21/2013 - 9:12pm

Is this true?

[The review of glaucoma by the The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force concludes] pretty much what we have been saying here for a looooong time...!

Or this?

The message on the confusion about glaucoma and its treatment has not changed in more than ten years.  The knowledge base about glaucoma has barely moved the needle in decades.  Everything developed to date has been a band aid, while the root causes of the disease remain unknown.

The two most important facts you should know about glaucoma

Submitted by dave on Mon, 08/29/2011 - 4:28pm

Trabecular Meshwork Cell (detail)

Trabecular Meshwork Cell (detail)

This is the winning image for North America -- IN Cell Image Competition. It shows the internal structure of a single trabecular meshwork cell.

In this image, DNA has been stained blue, so the large clumps of blue just above centre are the cell's nucleus. Red lines are filaments of actin spread throughout the cell, while the green patches at their tips are the focal adhesions.

Some of my favorite articles on FitEyes.com

Submitted by dave on Tue, 12/07/2010 - 3:03pm

FitEyes favorite articlesI think the following list represents some of the most informative and useful articles on FitEyes.com. There are thousands of articles on FitEyes.com, so many good ones will not be on this list. But this list is a good place to start reading if you are new to FitEyes.com. If you are not new to our site, please make sure you have seen these articles.

Please feel welcome to add comments to this post to mention your own favorite articles on FitEyes.com.

My experiences with self-tonometry

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on Tue, 05/04/2010 - 3:00pm

I have been part of FitEyes since 2006 and I bought my tonometer in late 2006. I've been using it almost every day since then. I am very calm about measuring my IOP perhaps 2 or 4 times a day (or sometimes not at all if away from home).

While away from home I use drops 'just in case'; at home I might go for several days with no drops while I monitor my IOP with my tonometer .

Complementary Therapy for the Treatment of Glaucoma by Robert Ritch

Submitted by rritch on Sat, 02/13/2010 - 11:02am

by Robert Ritch, MD

From the Departments of Ophthalmology, The New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY, and The New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY

Supported in part by the Joseph and Marilyn Rosen Research Fund of the New York Glaucoma Research Institute

Corresponding author: Robert Ritch, MD, Glaucoma Associates of New York, The New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, 310 East 14th Street suite 304, New York, NY, 10003

Glaucoma is a progressive optic neuropathy characterized by a specific pattern of optic nerve head and visual field damage. Damage to the visual system in glaucoma is due to the death of the retinal ganglion cells, the axons of which comprise the optic nerve and carry the visual impulses from the eye to the brain. Glaucoma represents a final common pathway resulting from a number of different conditions that can affect the eye, many of which are associated with elevated intraocular pressure (IOP). It is important to realize that elevated IOP is not synonymous with glaucoma, but rather is the most important risk factor we know of for the development and/or progression of glaucomatous damage.

Light exposure from ophthalmology exams: An analysis of potential hazards

Another thing that has me worried is the bright lights I get subjected to in the form of ophthalmoscopy, slit lamp exam, and fundus photos. Those lights can be painful when they are too bright (which they usually are). I read that bright lights can cause apoptosis (cell death spiral) of the ganglion cells. Of course every doctor I ask says that the lights are not bright enough to cause apoptosis.

 
It would certainly be ironic if, in the course of following our disease, we are subjecting our eyes to proceedures that raise our presures and cause our ganglion cell layer to self destruct! But my gut tells me that to some degree, that is what is I am doing. ~ Bob

Will cholesterol-lowering drugs prevent glaucoma progression?

I received this question today:
Hi David,
I would like to ask a question about a new medication that my glaucoma specialist has recommended to my GP. The glaucoma specialist has recommended that I start taking Lipitor, the old cholesterol drug. My glaucoma specialist said there is a 30% to 40% chance Lipitor will prevent further progression of my glaucoma.Is it a common thing for people to take Lipitor, as I'm not keen at all to start taking a statin if i don't have to. And i don't know any other people with elevated eye pressure or glaucoma.

For background, I'm also taking Travatan eye drops in the evening.  I have have no damage yet from slightly elevated pressure in my eyes and I'm a 44yr old insulin-dependant diabetic. My cholesterol is in the acceptable range also.  Id rather go with more natural ways, if possible. Would you have any opinion?

Pages

Subscribe to FitEyes.com RSS Feed Subscribe to glaucoma