DNA

Genome-wide association analyses of genetic, phenotypic, and environmental risks in the age-related eye disease study

Mol Vis. 2010 Dec 17;16:2811-21.

Genome-wide association analyses of genetic, phenotypic, and environmental risks in the age-related eye disease study.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Gene associated with exfoliation glaucoma: LOXL1

Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2011 Apr 12;52(5):2372-8. doi: 10.1167/iovs.10-6268. Print 2011 Apr.

LOXL1 promoter haplotypes are associated with exfoliation syndrome in a U.S. Caucasian population.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

B-vitamins intake, DNA-methylation of One Carbon Metabolism and homocysteine pathway genes and myocardial infarction risk

Abstract

Background and aims

Association between MTHFR C677T polymorphism and primary open-angle glaucoma: A meta-analysis

Abstract

The role of SIRT1 in ocular aging and glaucoma

The role of SIRT1 in ocular aging.

The sirtuins are a family of enzymes that regulate DNA expression. The sirtuin family helps regulate the lifespan of diverse organisms. Humans have seven different sirtuins (SIRT1-7). This study suggests that SIRT1 may provide protection against diseases related to oxidative stress-induced ocular damage, including cataract, age-related macular degeneration, and optic nerve degeneration in glaucoma patients.

Abstract:

Mitochondrial DNA changes in glaucoma patients

Mitochondrial DNA nucleotide changes in primary congenital glaucoma patients.

Genetic analysis showed that glaucoma patients belong to three groups. Fifty percent of the patients belonged to one group (the H2a2a lineage of the N-derived haplogroup*).

Glaucoma and genetics: Is DNA the Key?

Submitted by dave on Wed, 02/13/2008 - 12:43am

Obviously, genetics are an important factor in how we develop and age. However, genetics are probably one of the most over rated-factors involved in the development of disease. In short, my position is that our DNA is not the key to glaucoma.

The standard party line goes about like the paragraph below, which is written by the distinguished Wallace L.M. Alward, M.D. I do not mean any disrepect to Dr. Alward, but I do wish to highlight that this line of thinking is quickly becoming outdated. Here is what Dr. Alward said in the September 2005 issue of Gleams: 

Glaucoma and genetics: Is DNA the Key?

Submitted by dave on Wed, 02/13/2008 - 12:43am

 

Obviously, genetics are an important factor in how we develop and age. However, genetics are probably one of the most over rated-factors involved in the development of disease. In short, my position is that our DNA is not the key to glaucoma.

The standard party line goes about like the paragraph below, which is written by the distinguished Wallace L.M. Alward, M.D. I do not mean any disrepect to Dr. Alward, but I do wish to highlight that this line of thinking is quickly becoming outdated. Here is what Dr. Alward said in the September 2005 issue of Gleams: 

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