herbs

Complementary Therapy for the Treatment of Glaucoma by Robert Ritch

Submitted by rritch on Sat, 02/13/2010 - 11:02am

by Robert Ritch, MD

From the Departments of Ophthalmology, The New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY, and The New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY

Supported in part by the Joseph and Marilyn Rosen Research Fund of the New York Glaucoma Research Institute

Corresponding author: Robert Ritch, MD, Glaucoma Associates of New York, The New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, 310 East 14th Street suite 304, New York, NY, 10003

Glaucoma is a progressive optic neuropathy characterized by a specific pattern of optic nerve head and visual field damage. Damage to the visual system in glaucoma is due to the death of the retinal ganglion cells, the axons of which comprise the optic nerve and carry the visual impulses from the eye to the brain. Glaucoma represents a final common pathway resulting from a number of different conditions that can affect the eye, many of which are associated with elevated intraocular pressure (IOP). It is important to realize that elevated IOP is not synonymous with glaucoma, but rather is the most important risk factor we know of for the development and/or progression of glaucomatous damage.

Non-pharmaceutical medications and approaches to glaucoma (all articles)

Submitted by rritch on Wed, 09/15/2010 - 9:33am

The blog post contains several articles. Keep scrolling down past the references at the end of each article to read the next article.

Section Leaders: Makoto Araie, Robert Ritch, Clement Tham

Contributors: Makoto Aihara, Aiko Iwase, Sandra Fernando, Michael S Kook, Simon Law, Robert Nussenblatt, Vincenzo Parisi, Nathan Radcliffe, Douglas Rhee, Kwok-Fai So, Raymond Chuen-Chung CHANG, He Wei, Lori Ventura

Consensus points

  • Plant extracts have been used medicinally throughout history. Every society has plants used medicinally

  • Even dogs eat grass when sick, while chimpanzees consume a variety of non-food plants medicinally. This is learned behavior

  • Our modern pharmacopoiea of drugs were originally synthesized from plants used medicinally. These include vitamin C, digitalis, penicillin, and pilocarpine.

  • Chinese traditional medicine in its written form dates back 5000 years.

  • Technically speaking, vitamins fall into this category. We depend on essential vitamins from food for survival. There is a fine line between nutrition and medicinal uses of plants.

  • It was only in the 20th century, with the advent of single molecule products synthesized and patented by pharmaceutical companies and U.S. medical school philosophiesthat other non-pharmaceutical traditional medications came under attack, leading often to their being ridiculed and held in contempt.Thus, in order to get away from this view, we prefer the term “non-pharmaceutical therapy” to “alternative” or “complementary”

  • Many available natural compounds used as “non-pharmaceutical therapy” have been reported to show beneficial effects on circulation, the immune system, and neuroprotective activities in vitro and in vivo.

  • The mechanism of action of neuroprotection most common to natural compounds is antioxidant/free radical scavenging activity. However, many other actions are present and some extracts, such as Gingko biloa and curcumin have widespread activity on a number of enzyme systems.

  • Comment: Some of these compounds reportedly modify expression of enzymes relating to excitotoxicity, apoptosis, inflammation, lipid peroxidation, or immune stimulation. Some of these compounds have undergone clinical trials to evidence their effects on systemic diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders.

Curcumin in eye diseases

Submitted by dave on Wed, 07/14/2010 - 12:22am

Curcumin has been implicated in the treatment of certain eye diseases and conditions, including chronic anterior uveitis, an inflammatory condition of the vascular layer, particularly the iris. Read about a study that suggests that curcumin may be an effective therapeutic for a variety of inflammatory eye conditions.

Are herbs effective for lowering eye pressure?

Submitted by dave on Thu, 04/22/2010 - 8:16pm

My original expectation was that elevated intraocular pressure would respond to herbs (and vitamins) in the same way every other physical complaint I had encountered in my life responded.

My initial strategy for managing my IOP was a strategy built on herbs and supplements. That strategy was a complete 100% total failure.

Cure for glaucoma which leads to blindness may be on its way: lymphatics found in eye

Submitted by dave on Wed, 04/07/2010 - 8:54am

Cure for glaucoma soon, says new research
newkerala.com/nkfullnews-1-125456.html

October 6th, 2009 SindhToday
Toronto, Oct 6 (IANS) Cure for glaucoma which leads to blindness may be on its way.

Canadian researchers have discovered an unidentified form of circulation in the human eye which may provide important clues to glaucoma.

The human eye is considered to lack lymphatics – a circulation responsible for pumping fluid and waste out of tissues.

But now researchers at the Universityof Toronto and the local St Michael’s Hospital say the inability to clear that fluid from the eye is linked to glaucoma which currently affects over 66 million people worldwide.

What are the best nutritional supplements for treating glaucoma?

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on Sat, 12/19/2009 - 12:37pm

What are the best supplements For Treating Glaucoma, or for general Eye health?? I have had glaucoma since 2001, and since last year i have had to increase My Trusopts drops from 2 to 3 per day. I'm very frustrated about this. can You suggest any vitamins that are specifically for Glaucoma or For general eye health? Is there any known reversal for OPTIC NERVE DAMMAGE? Thank you very much for your help. Sincerely John

One of the Key Herbs that Prevents and Treats Swine Flu

Submitted by dave on Thu, 09/17/2009 - 11:02am

Ayurveda, India’s traditional 'science of life,' has the remedy for swine flu in the form of the basil leaves commonly known as Tulsi.

Tulsi is well known in India for its remarkable healing properties. But the anti-flu property of Tulsi has been discovered by medical experts across the world quite recently. Tulsi improves your body's overall defense mechanism, including its ability to fight viral diseases.
Apart from acting as a preventive medicine, Tulsi can also help a patient recover faster

Turmeric offers effective neurprotection - may be important in glaucoma to prevent optic nerve damage

Submitted by dave on Sun, 09/13/2009 - 11:23am

Regular use of traditional dietary spices such as turmeric in one's cooking may be important for glaucoma patients. The use of complete spices (e.g., turmeric rather than curcumin, which is an isolated fraction of turmeric) is important as well as the use of multiple complimentary spices according to long-established wisdom such as found in Ayurveda. Still, the research backing up anti-oxidant properties of turmeric is a useful read.

Gingko Biloba shown to protect optic nerve cells from injury

Submitted by dave on Thu, 08/27/2009 - 10:05am

Oral consumption of Ginkgo biloba led to a higher survival rate of optic nerve cells (retinal ganglion cells). The effect was dosage-dependent - the higher concentrations of Ginkgo resulted in higher optic nerve cell survival rates. The dosages of Ginkgo were comparable to those an average person could safely consume.

Dosage dependence of the effect of Ginkgo biloba on the rat retinal ganglion cell survival after optic nerve crush - Abstract 

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